Problems With Steel Connected SCIPS

SIPCRETE SCIP WAS DEVELOPED IN ASSOCIATION WITH A BIG 3D PANELS USER TO OVERCOME THIS PROBLEM VERY SUCCESSFULLY ALL STEEL CONNECTED PANELS EMMERDU ETC SUFFER FROM THIS SERIOUS PROBLEM LOOK AT Sipcrete.com FOR THE SOLUTION

Yes, there is an intrinsic issue with thermal bridging with the steel trusses. As you know, steel is HORRENDOUS when it comes to thermal bridging, it is the worst material in regards to thermal bridging. Steel basically has no R-Value to it. With the R-value of steel at approximately 0.003 per inch, when compared to other construction materials such as wood (average R-value of approximately 2.5 per inch), steel basically has no R-Value to it and is a thermal bridging nightmare.

SCIP’s have these steel trusses that are not thermally broken and they will thermally bridge and reduce the total R-Value of the wall. Now the million dollar question. How do you quantify it? ORNL did a Hotbox Test of a SCIP wall and it performed not so well. It dropped the R-Value of the wall foam by 35%. Although the SCIP guys will fight the test results, it makes sense because these trusses are everywhere and it all adds up.

Steel will thermal bridge and when you have a SCIP that has steel trusses that are exposed to the exterior by sitting inside of a shotcrete concrete wall and then that same steel truss bridges to the interior wall, it will reduce the R-Value of that wall assembly. Anyone who tells you otherwise is denying the scientific facts and has something to sell you. Even concrete has a better R-Value of an average R-value of approximately 0.1 per inch. Nothing great but better than 0.003 of steel.

Rebar in concrete slabs will thermally bridge. Engineering companies like Schock will use stainless steel rebar in places to help reduce that thermal bridge since stainless steel performs better than standard steel. Even with the stainless steel, there is still some thermal bridging going on in that rebar. Steel = horrendous thermal bridge

Read more: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/community/forum/general-questions/36336/isnt-there-intrinsic-problem-scip-building-systems-ie-therma#ixzz5IZF2GvVW
Follow us: @gbadvisor on Twitter | GreenBuildingAdvisor on Facebook
Yes, there is an intrinsic issue with thermal bridging with the steel trusses. As you know, steel is HORRENDOUS when it comes to thermal bridging, it is the worst material in regards to thermal bridging. Steel basically has no R-Value to it. With the R-value of steel at approximately 0.003 per inch, when compared to other construction materials such as wood (average R-value of approximately 2.5 per inch), steel basically has no R-Value to it and is a thermal bridging nightmare.

SCIP’s have these steel trusses that are not thermally broken and they will thermally bridge and reduce the total R-Value of the wall. Now the million dollar question. How do you quantify it? ORNL did a Hotbox Test of a SCIP wall and it performed not so well. It dropped the R-Value of the wall foam by 35%. Although the SCIP guys will fight the test results, it makes sense because these trusses are everywhere and it all adds up.

Steel will thermal bridge and when you have a SCIP that has steel trusses that are exposed to the exterior by sitting inside of a shotcrete concrete wall and then that same steel truss bridges to the interior wall, it will reduce the R-Value of that wall assembly. Anyone who tells you otherwise is denying the scientific facts and has something to sell you. Even concrete has a better R-Value of an average R-value of approximately 0.1 per inch. Nothing great but better than 0.003 of steel.

Rebar in concrete slabs will thermally bridge. Engineering companies like Schock will use stainless steel rebar in places to help reduce that thermal bridge since stainless steel performs better than standard steel. Even with the stainless steel, there is still some thermal bridging going on in that rebar. Steel = horrendous thermal bridge

Read more: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/community/forum/general-questions/36336/isnt-there-intrinsic-problem-scip-building-systems-ie-therma#ixzz5IZF2GvVW
Follow us: @gbadvisor on Twitter | GreenBuildingAdvisor on Facebook

Yes, there is an intrinsic issue with thermal bridging with the steel trusses. As you know, steel is HORRENDOUS when it comes to thermal bridging, it is the worst material in regards to thermal bridging. Steel basically has no R-Value to it. With the R-value of steel at approximately 0.003 per inch, when compared to other construction materials such as wood (average R-value of approximately 2.5 per inch), steel basically has no R-Value to it and is a thermal bridging nightmare.

SCIP’s have these steel trusses that are not thermally broken and they will thermally bridge and reduce the total R-Value of the wall. Now the million dollar question. How do you quantify it? ORNL did a Hotbox Test of a SCIP wall and it performed not so well. It dropped the R-Value of the wall foam by 35%. Although the SCIP guys will fight the test results, it makes sense because these trusses are everywhere and it all adds up.

Steel will thermal bridge and when you have a SCIP that has steel trusses that are exposed to the exterior by sitting inside of a shotcrete concrete wall and then that same steel truss bridges to the interior wall, it will reduce the R-Value of that wall assembly. Anyone who tells you otherwise is denying the scientific facts and has something to sell you. Even concrete has a better R-Value of an average R-value of approximately 0.1 per inch. Nothing great but better than 0.003 of steel.

Rebar in concrete slabs will thermally bridge. Engineering companies like Schock will use stainless steel rebar in places to help reduce that thermal bridge since stainless steel performs better than standard steel. Even with the stainless steel, there is still some thermal bridging going on in that rebar. Steel = horrendous thermal bridge

Read more: http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/community/forum/general-questions/36336/isnt-there-intrinsic-problem-scip-building-systems-ie-therma#ixzz5IZF2GvVW
Follow us: @gbadvisor on Twitter | GreenBuildingAdvisor on Facebook

SIPCRETE SCIP WAS DEVELOPED IN ASSOCIATION WITH A BIG 3D PANELS USER TO OVERCOME THIS PROBLEM VERY SUCCESSFULLY

One thought on “Problems With Steel Connected SCIPS

  1. Siptec says:

    SIPCRETE SCIP WAS DEVELOPED IN ASSOCIATION WITH A BIG 3D PANELS USER TO OVERCOME THIS PROBLEM VERY SUCCESSFULLY ALL STEEL CONNECTED PANELS EMMERDU ETC SUFFER FROM THIS SERIOUS PROBLEM
    SIPCRETE DOES NOT THERMALLY BRIDGE AND IS FAR CHEAPER TO PRODUCE WITH ANY TYPE OF INSULATION CORE WITH FAR SUPERIOR THERMAL INSULATION WHEN USING PUR / PIR

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